Biography

"Now that the trend of aging rockers cutting albums of show tunes and standards seems thankfully to have run its course, we're back to vocalists with a real feel for and understanding of the jazz tradition doing them justice. Nashville's Monica Ramey is a shining example. Her excellent release Make Someone Happy offers resourceful, soaring and engaging interpretations of material from The Great American Songbook."  -Ron Wynn, Nashville Scene

This kind of reaction is a reoccurring theme in the case of Midwest native Monica Ramey and artists like Michael Feinstein, Beegie Adair, Anthony Wilson, Jeff Coffin, Donna McElroy, Jim Ferguson, Denis Solee, Jeff Steinberg, Lori Mechem, Roger Spencer, George Tidwell and Sandra Dudley are just a few who are singing her praise.

Monica is a native of Francesville, one of Indiana’s smallest towns. The youngest of three children, her father is a retired farmer and her mother a retired music teacher. As a child, Monica would sing and dance on stage with her mother’s high school show choir, and at the age of 3, she stood on the grand piano at the school’s cabaret and performed Tomorrow from the musical, Annie. By the age of 11, she had become well known in Indiana after starring in several local and professional Broadway musical productions. As a teenager, she studied at the Los Angeles County High School of the Arts, and in 1995, Monica was selected to become a member of the GRAMMY National All American High School Jazz Band and Choir.

This break would become one of the most important opportunities in Monica's life. Being one of 12 selected nationally for the choir, Monica had little jazz experience, but while performing with some of the music industry's finest, she discovered the impact of jazz music in her own life and in our society. The responsibility all performers have to its preservation and authenticity left a profound and lasting impact on her.

Monica studied Music Performance at Indiana State University and was a member of the ISU Jazz Singers. She became a favorite singer among many faculty members and even the President of the university. This led to many performances at university functions and sporting events. She interned for the NARAS Foundation in Los Angeles, where the preservation of jazz music became a focal point of her responsibilities.

In 2000, she moved to Nashville to pursue her singing career, where she discovered the Nashville Jazz Workshop. NJW has given Monica the opportunity to study under some of Nashville finest musicians including Lori Mechem, Roger Spencer, Sandra Dudley, Beegie Adair, Jeff Steinberg, Rod McGaha, Jim Ferguson, Roy Agee, Annie Sellick as well as create a family away from home.

On her debut album, Make Someone Happy, Monica is joined by the Lori Mechem Trio and special guest, Beegie Adair. This special project hosts many standard tunes with horn arrangements by Denis Solee and two original tunes by Lori Mechem, Beegie Adair and Hal Stephens. Produced by Lori Mechem, Roger Spencer and Sandra Dudley, the album captures the finest example of Monica's musical capabilities at this point in her career.  Make Someone Happy is receiving international airplay on jazz radio, Pandora, Music Choice and DMX to name a few. 

Her second album, Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio, accentuates the undeniable chemistry of one of the world’s most successful jazz trios (Beegie Adair, piano; Roger Spencer, bass; Chris Brown, drums) with a vocalist (Ramey) who elegantly interweaves lush, lyrical sophistication to an already immaculate musical conversation. Produced by Adair and Spencer, the album also features on two of the trio and Ramey’s most endeared musical mates, jazz masters George Tidwell and Denis Sole, on several tracks.  The result is the introduction and re-introduction of some of jazz’s most beloved and forgotten songs and the introduction of an original tune, co-written by Adair.  

Her third album, Some Enchanted Evening, is her “dream project”; a piano/vocal duo album with Beegie Adair.  The album, released in April 2016, features some of the greatest Broadway tunes ever written like “Someone To Watch Over Me”, “My Funny Valentine” and “Some Enchanted Evening”.  This album was produced by Ms. Adair’s long-time producer, Jack Jezzro, and released by Green Hill Music and Burton Avenue Music.  

Monica performs regularly in various venues, festivals and private events throughout the U.S. including the legendary Birdland, Feinstein’s/54 Below, Nashville Jazz Workshop and many others. When not studying or performing, Monica enjoys spending time with her friends, her family, traveling and gardening. Monica supports various animal and human rights organizations. 

“The pairing of Beegie and Monica is a master class on how to interpret timeless songs with style, taste and a swinging contemporary sensibility.””

— Michael Feinstein

05/28/13 Monica Ramey & the Beegie Adair Trio Adair Music Group By Christopher Loudon There was a brief period in the late 1950s and very early ’60s when Capitol sagely paired George Shearing with a succession of the label’s top vocalists, including Peggy Lee, Dakota Staton, Nancy Wilson and Nat King Cole. The results were uniformly wonderful, setting a standard for sophistication that has, until now, never quite been equaled. But in Monica Ramey and Beegie Adair, Shearing and company have finally met their match. Ramey and Adair have united before. The pianist joined the then-neophyte singer for two tracks on her 2009 debut album, Make Someone Happy. But they provided merely a subtle hint of the rich banquet to come. Perhaps it’s the urbane playlist, peppered with the well-aged likes of “You Fascinate Me So,” “Will You Still Be Mine?,” “Lullaby of the Leaves” and “Whisper Not.” Or maybe it’s Ramey’s ability to blend the suavity of Bobby Short with the sangfroid of Lee Wiley. Or it could be Adair’s refined agility, reminiscent of the young Barbara Carroll. Actually, it’s the combination of all three that evokes a sense of those bespoke Shearing days. Most impressive, the overall feeling here is more respectful than retro, as if some tony East Side boîte had, like Brigadoon, magically re-emerged. Along for the stylish ride are Adair’s triomates, bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown, here and there augmented by George Tidwell on trumpet and flugelhorn and Denis Solee on saxophones and flute. ”

Christopher Loudon, Jazz Times

"I think that Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio sound awesome together! It's obvious, when you listen, that they have a simpatico personal and professional relationship. These are some of Nashville's very finest and the addition of saxophonist Denis Solee and trumpeter George Tidwell are icing on an already tasty cake. Great singing + great playing + great tunes = great music! This is a recording that people anywhere will enjoy anytime."”

Jeff Coffin (saxophonist, bandleader, composer, educator, photographer and all-around bad-ass)

Your album is "Sparkling and Refreshing" and I am a FAN!”

— Snookie Jones, Owner-Philly Syndication/Vice President-Gravity Entertainment

Monica Ramey gives me the feeling that I can make it through any obstacle in life. Her music encompasses love, joy, sadness, hope, and humor. These are qualities that most artists strive for in their music, but few achieve. Monica presents the human experience, in such a beautiful way. Ladies and Gentleman, welcome to Monica Ramey.”

— Rod McGaha, Trumpeter/Composer

“Elegant, sinewy recountings of classic ‘tales’ from the 20th century songbook, passionately sung by Miss Ramey as if each was a personal confession. Accompanied by trio and quartet arrangements that are a miracle – at times controlled and concise, at others, fervent and daring, all the while abundant with wisdom. This record provides new reasons to adore these songs!””

Chris Walters (pianist, singer, songwriter, producer, arranger, and owner of the hippest eyeglasses ever)

"Monica is truly an "Artist." Her interpretation and phrasing of these works are moving and beautiful."”

Marcus Finnie, Drummer/Arranger

"Make Someone Happy is like a meal that someone cooked for you with lots of love. You can taste the love."”

— Heather Brand, Photographer

Make Someone Happy, Monica Ramey, vocals. "On her debut CD, Nashville singer Monica Ramey displays a velvety voice on a handful of choice tunes including infrequently heard ones like “Dream Dancing,” “You Hit the Spot,” “Passion Flower” and “Give Him the Ooh-la-la.” But the award winner was the opener, a Blossom Dearie tune called “Hey, John.” Carmen McRae’s version of it was a wake up call from the past, but Ramey comes darn close. Some sparkling arrangements for horns add some luster to the performance. Ramey has learned the lesson of never over-decorating a tune, something some singers seemingly never understand. I liked her a lot!" Cognito, 2010; 46:20. 3/10/10”

George Fendel, Jazz Society of Oregon

"I listen to your CD often and like it better each time. I particularly like "Goodbye is All That's Left to Say". A beautiful tune written and sang by some of my favorite people. Lori's solo is just beautiful." ”

— Ken Christianson, Fan

"This is my favorite CD right now..I play it all the time!! Makes me happy!! You have a beautiful voice and I love the way you express yourself! Congrats!! Way to shine!"”

— Georgia W., Fan

"When you combine sophistication, musical royalty and a fresh approach to the Great American Songbook, you get "Monica Ramey with the Beegie Adair Trio". This new CD is a wonderful blend of classic songs, beautiful arrangements and world class musicianship. Monica's exquisite vocal performance with Beegie's elegant piano style is a match made in heaven."”

Lori Mechem, pianist/songwriter/educator/co-founder of the Nashville Jazz Workshop

"Your stage presence is that of a long-time jazz singer. It is so warm and amazing. Your voice. Man, your voice. I was blown away! Just such an amazing gift to see & hear. Your choice of notes with your singing--this is a word I love to use with musicians--"Tasty". It was just right, so natural. You are a TRUE jazzer! It just naturally comes out of your soul."”

— J’nae Fincannon, Singer/Songwriter

"Oh, Monica, your CD is simply brilliant. Not only is your voice wonderful -- even flawless, but also your diction and phrasing are impeccable. In some of the songs where I thought that I "knew" the lyrics I was amazed to hear words that I never knew were there. But even more important (perhaps) you make the listener know what the song is about. Of course, your outstanding phrasing is related to your phenomenal breath control. Whew. But I also love your -- well, in my language --"touch." I can feel smiles, frowns, disappointments, etc. simply in the way you "say" a word. Well, my dear Monica, in essence: SUPERB."”

— Dr. Sheron Dailey, Dr. Sheron Dailey, Emerita Professor of Communication, Indiana State University (and Monica's very favorite college professor!)

"It is my extreme pleasure to admiringly and respectfully to tell you how proud and moved I am to have watched and listened as you've come into your own in the past two years. I remember when you first started talking about your cd and were dreaming about the songs you were going to select. I am so honored to know you, and the party of friends you used on your project. Lori, Roger, Chris, and James are not to be compared as the ultimate compliment to your gorgeous instrument! Not to mention my old friends George, Dennis, and Roy, the consummate and tastiest horn section EVER!!! Congratulations, and YOU GO, GIRL!!!"”

— Donna McElroy, Vocalist/Songwriter/Educator

Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio Album Release Nashville Scene Critic's Pick … On her sophomore release, Monica Ramey further establishes herself as a first-rate interpreter of the jazz canon. Eschewing scat improv or excessive vibrato, Ramey opts for a subtle approach, finding the beauty in the melodies that made songs like “Witchcraft,” “Lullaby of the Leaves,” “This Could Be the Start of Something Big” and “You Fascinate Me So” the classics they are. That’s not to say Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Triois a by-the-book exercise — Ramey has a knack for phrasing, at times employing an almost conversational approach that suggests she’d be pretty good at musical theater too. She’s especially effective on ballads like “I’ll Close My Eyes,” “Change Partners” and “Fly Away” (co-written by Adair and Lori Mechem), which showcase the delicate timbre of her voice. And she proves she has the one indispensable skill to be a successful jazz singer: selecting a terrific backing band. Pianist Adair, bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown are the cream of Nashville’s crop, particularly when it comes to accompanying vocalists. Local jazz stalwarts George Tidwell (trumpet) and Dennis Solee (saxophone, flute) make guest appearances. 12/6/12”

Jack Silverman, Nashville Scene

"The American Songbook is truly the gift that keeps on giving, constantly reinventing itself with each new generation. It does my heart - and my ears! - so much good to hear Monica Ramey pick up the torch and run with it. Her theatrical roots combine with her obvious deep affection for the classic popular song to give us a freshly unique take on the material she's chosen for her debut. It's sassy, swinging and totally enjoyable. Looking forward to Volume II!"”

— Jeff Steinberg, Musician/Arranger/Composer

"Midwest native Monica Ramey's intellect, sophistication, honesty are on full display on her debut CD, "Make Someone Happy." Ramey's voice floats on top of the music provided by some of Nashville's best including the Lori Mechem Trio, Denis Solee, Roy Agee, George Tidwell, James Hollihan and special guest Beegie Adair. "Make Someone Happy" is sexy, smart, fresh and full of swing. Listening to this CD makes me happy, one listen and you'll be happy too."”

— Maxx Myrick, Myrick Media

Monica Ramey has a throwback voice to the Depression Era, when Tin Pan Alley ruled the music world. Tamed with an in sync trio of Beegie Adair/p, Rger Spencer/b and Chris Brown/dr and a couple guests, Ramey freshens up chestnuts like “Oh! Look at Me Now” and “Witchcraft” with a soothing, slinking and home cooked style. With simple accompaniment by Adair, she carries a torch on “ I Thought About You” while with the trio is guilelessly optimistic on “As Long As I Live.” Some nice tenor work by Denis Solee is found on some tracks, and his flute on the whimisical “You Fascinate Me So” is a perfect partner for Ms. Ramey; trumpeter George Tidwell also serves up some nice support on the undulating “Change Partners. “ Classy work. 4/25/13”

George Harris, Jazz Weekly

Recording of the Month: Monica Ramey And the Beegie Adair Trio Musical Performance: ****1/2 Sound Quality: ****1/2 Overall Enjoyment: ****1/2 Nashville is well known for its fabulous country singers, but on the evidence of this CD, jazz, too, is alive there, and doing very, very well. Pianist Beegie Adair has 34 recordings to her credit, and she and her trio -- bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown -- play a weekly date at F. Scott’s Restaurant & Jazz Bar, whose patrons must count themselves very fortunate to hear such amazing music. The three have played together a long time, and their musical lines weave in and out comfortably as the musical spotlight shines first on one, then the other. Though each has a distinct musical personality, they come together in perfect unanimity, seeming to breathe together -- “tight-knit” is an understatement. Singer Monica Ramey used to go hear the trio, and once in a while they’d ask her to sit in. One thing led to another, and now comes this disc of songs from the Great American Songbook. Ramey sounds as if she’s been singing with the trio for decades. Her fine voice, when used saucily, as in “Witchcraft” here, can sound a bit like Ella Fitzgerald’s, but most of the time she reminds me of Barbra Streisand, whom Ramey lists as an influence. Things get off to a rousing, rhythmic start with a driving version of “As Long as I Live,” followed by a ruminative “I Thought About You.” Later we’re treated to a jumping version of Steve Allen’s “This Could Be the Start of Something Big,” propelled by Spencer’s unerringly accurate and musical bass lines, to which is added a dynamic break: a saxophone solo by guest Denis Solee. A sultry version of Irving Berlin’s “Change Partners” adds another guest, trumpeter George Tidwell. Ramey makes this one downright sexy, singing as if whispering in the listener’s ear. Both guests join in a heartfelt performance of “Will You Still Be Mine?,” but the final track is just Ramey and Adair in a nostalgic, pitch-perfect version of “Why Did I Choose You?,” a song that did so well for Streisand in her early days. The sound throughout is spot-on, with presence, transparency, warmth, and ideal balances. Though we can always hear them on recordings, the great female singers are almost all gone now. It’s time we embraced some of the great artists of this generation. I’d like to nominate Monica Ramey, especially when she’s singing with the Beegie Adair Trio. Lucky Nashville. Lucky you when you hear this CD. 3/1/14”

Rad Bennett, Ultra Audio- Sound Stage! Xtreme

"An artist with a cool, refreshing voice and style. A project with songs that fit her like a glove and accompanied by seasoned professionals. Monica Ramey is a delight-to hear her is to know her!"”

— Sandra Dudley, Jazz Vocalist/Educator

Monica Ramey — Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio – Adair Music Group, 72:33 ****: (Monica Ramey – vocals; Beege Adair – piano, Roger Spencer – bass; Chris Brown — drums; George Tidwell – trumpet & flugelhorn (track 3, 6, 13): Denis Solee – saxophone & flute (track 5, 8, 10, 13). Monica hails from Francesville, Indiana and is the daughter of a retired farmer and mother who is a retired music teacher. Monica grew up performing in Indiana in several professional Broadway musical productions during her formative years according to her biography. She studied at Los Angeles County High School of the Arts. She later became a member of the GRAMMY National All American High School Jazz Band and Choir. She studied at Indiana State University and was part of the ISU Jazz Singers. She had a taste of performing with some top musicians. Having participated in these groups she went on to study music performance at Indiana State University. She interned in Los Angeles with the NARAS Foundation Her primary responsibilities in this capacity was the preservation of Jazz. Monica moved to Nashville where she became involved with the Nashville Jazz Workshop. She worked with a number of personalities and is where she became acquainted with Beege Adair. Beegie Adair has over 90 accreditations in her discography. Beege is familiar to me as I played many of Beege’s albums on air hosting a show on the Portland jazz station in the 2000s. Monica said in her biography she was in the audience frequently at Beege’s performances. They met and Beege would call her up to sing occasionally. Monica went on to join with the Lori Meacham Trio on Monica’s debut album Make Someone Happy. Beege Adair was a special guest and contributed on the album, released in 2009. Moving forward, Monica and the Beege Adair Trio appeared at Birdland in New York, January of this year. They are going to appear together at Birdland again in early May 2013. You can go to http://www.monicaramey.com and select the fan photos and video button. There is a video of a performance on stage of the song, “Change Partners” which is included in this album that is superb and shows the essence of their performance. This album Monica Ramey and the Beege Adair Trio was released in late 2012. The music selections are very nice with songs from the American Songbook, and some newer songs including some work from Beege Adair. “As Long As I Live” is a Harold Arlen/Ted Koehler composition and a good start to this album. It begins with a few bar intro by Beege on piano to be joined by Roger Spence on a wonderfully clear and solid walking bass. They are joined shortly by Monica in her rich clear voice and it swings! After Monica’s vocal the trio swings interacting with each other taking some solos finishing with Monica who closes out the tune and it was very delightful. “I Thought About You”, a Jimmy Van Heusen/Johnny Mercer tune, starts slow with Monica singing thoughtfully. The tempo breaks and starts in a strong walking beat mixed back and forth within the trio and winds up together with Monica finishing. On “Witchcraft”, I thought “Oh my, a Sinatra signature tune, this may not work”. I was wrong! Monica made it her own with her sound and phrasing. It’s not a competition between the singers, but another wonderful rendition of Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh’s popular and solid entry to the American Songbook. “This Could be the Start of Something Big”. Steve Allen is a favorite of mine and Monica and the trio make this tune move. They are joined by Dennis Solee guesting on saxophone and this is a really nice performance. There were some lyric changes to make it personal to these performers. “Change Partners” is a very popular Irving Berlin song and a strong choice from the American Songbook. Monica and the trio make this like the very intimate conversation Irving Berlin composed. Monica’s emotional plea comes out in this rendition to “Change Partners” and dance with me.. George Tidwell joins coming in and out throughout the tune on his flugelhorn. This is one of the best songs on this album for me. “Fly Away” is a Lori Mecham and Beege Adair composition. It is an esthetic rendering taking me to an image of beautiful scenery and far off places with one you obviously love. There are many more songs to come in the album but it closes with “Why Did I Choose You?”, a poignant, emotional song by Michael Leonard and Herbert Martin. Monica and Beege give a heartfelt and emotional duet on this that raised tears in my eyes and a sigh in my heart. An excellent performance. I must say, having seen her performance at her web site and listening to this album, Monica emanates the delivery listeners long for in an entertainer. The ability to feel and emote the understanding of the message of the lyrics and the feel for the song to the listener. That is pure gold for a musician. “Monica Ramey and the Beege Adair Trio” is a richly rewarding sweet performance of some wonderful songs and a mood setter that calls for some relaxation and perhaps a little wine with a close friend. Monica has the voice and the ability to convey the meanings and emotions of each song. The recording quality is excellent. The CD comes in a tri-fold cardboard sleeve container. It has excellent liner notes, some closeup photos of the artists, a review by guitarist Anthony Wilson, a message from Beege Adair and lastly some sweet words from Monica Ramey. TrackList: 1. As Long as I Live; 2. I Thought About You; 3. I’ll Close My Eyes; 4. Witchcraft; 5. This Could Be the Start of Something Big; 6. Change Partners; 7. Oh! Look at Me Now; 8. Lullaby of the Leaves; 9. Fly Away; 10. You Fascinate Me So; 11. Whisper Not; 12. It Amazes Me; 13. Will You Still be Mine?; 14. Why Did I Choose You?. 4/29/13”

Tim Taylor, Audio Audition

“I first heard Monica Ramey sing several years ago in a vocal class at The Nashville Jazz Workshop. I pulled her aside to encourage her to take her talent seriously. I soon realized that Monica didn’t really need to hear that from me. She was already well focused on building the skills she’d need as a student of standards and jazz music. Monica has become quite a serious singer and fine interpreter of the Great American Songbook. I’m sure you’ll agree upon hearing her debut release, Make Someone Happy.””

— Jim Ferguson, Bassist/Vocalist

Swingender Vocaljazz aus dem Mekka der Countrymusik Wetten, dass hier selbst bestinformierte Jazzfans weder die Sängerin Monica Ramey noch die Pianistin Beegie Adair kennen! Kein Wunder, denn wer ins Countrymusik-Mekka Nashville pilgert, hat mit Jazz meist nichts am Hut, sorry, am Stetson. Aber unter Südstaaten-Jazzaficionados geniessen das in der Tradition von Oscar Peterson und George Shearing elegant swingende Trio und die intonations- und diktionssichere Sängerin einen geradezu legendären Ruf, mit notorisch ausgebuchten Jazzclubs. Die sorgfältig produzierte und hervorragend aufgenommene CD mit 14 der haltbarsten Songs aus dem „Great American Songbook“ ist als Appetizer wärmstens empfohlen. (JS) Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio (Adair Music Group / cdBaby.com) Bewertung: 4 Sterne (in Worten: vier Sterne) 5/1/13”

Jörg Sommer, Schweiz am Sonntag

A cozy set of choice standards interpreted by the distinct and mellow voice of Monica Ramey, accompanied by the no-nonsense lush swinging style of pianist Beegie Adair, bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown. For the most part, Ramey plays it straight, choosing to reveal the timelessness of each melody. A personalized sense of phrasing, however, is evident on gems like "This Could Be the Start of Something Big" and "Lullaby of the Leaves." A toe-tapping, soulful listening experience from start to finish. 4/4/13”

John Barron, The Jazz World

CAUGHT IN THE ACT: MONICA RAMEY and BEEGIE ADAIR Birdland, New York City May 2, 2013 By Joe Lang Pianist Beegie Adair is a legendary figure on the Nashville jazz scene, and has many fans around the world. In recent years, she has occasionally worked with vocalist Monica Ramey. Their latest recorded effort is one that I reviewed in the March 2013 issue of Jersey Jazz. Upon hearing that they would be appearing together at Birdland on May 2, I immediately made arrangements to be there to review the gig. Getting to see and hear Beegie Adair in person was a real treat as she does not make the scene in New York very often. Experiencing Monica Ramey’s talent in person was also a fine listening experience. These two artists have a natural empathy that was evident on the album, and carried into their performance at Birdland. Ramey has a warm and easy style that is immediately accessible. Adair is a fine accompanist, and a superb jazz soloist. Most of the program featured songs from their recent release including “I Thought About You,” “As Long As I Live,” “Witchcraft,” “I’ll Close My Eyes,” Why Did I Choose You,” “Lullaby of the Leaves and “Oh, Look At Me Now,” the latter sung with the special words that were written for the Lee Wiley recording. The other selections were “Why Try to Change me now” and “Make Someone Happy. Adair took the solo spotlight with two engaging pieces, “By Myself” and “Last Night When We Were Young.” The folks in Nashville are fortunate to have Adair and Ramey performing frequently in their midst. For one special hour, they shared their artistry with an enthusiastic New York audience at one of the premier jazz venues in the City.”

— Joe Lang, Jersey Jazz Society Magazine

The true beauty of any Beegie Adair recording is that it will be straight down the middle mainstream jazz. It is money in the bank. Adair's 50-year career has found her leading her jazz trio, writing advertising jingles and accompanying vocalists, as she does on the present Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio. Ramey, a native of the midwest, take a predictably conservative approach to the Great American Songbook. Her doing so does us the favor of reminding us of jazz's most sturdy and enduring legacies, the assimilation and transformation of Tin Pan Alley and Show Tunes into the fabric of the American music vernacular. Ramey and Adair together create a certain low-key synergy, something like the momentum achieved when a large object starts to move. That large object is the repertoire and the singer and pianist have launched it against a zero coefficient of friction making the music seem to float regardless of its historic baggage. The tempi are breezy to brisk and the arrangements are dependable. The additions of trumpeter George Tidwell and saxophonist Denis Solee are well placed in the overall scheme of the recording. This is a very able recording to remind us of the simple pleasure of cocktail hour jazz: not too demanding and superbly played. Track Listing: As Long As I Live; I Thought About You; I’ll Close My Eyes; Witchcraft; This Could Be The Start of Something Big; Change Partners; Oh! Look At Me Now; Lullaby Of The Leaves; Fly Away; You Fascinate Me So; Whisper Not; It Amazes Me; Will You Still Be Mine?; Why Did I Choose You? Personnel: Monica Ramey: vocals; Beegie Adair: piano; Roger Spencer: bass; Chris Brown: drums; George Tidwell: trumpet, flugelhorn; Denis Solee: saxophones, flute. 5/20/13”

C. Michael Bailey, All About Jazz

Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio (Adair Music Group) brought to my attention a superb vocalist from Nashville, namely MONICA RAMEY. This is Ramey’s second album, and finds her in the company of the fine jazz pianist Beegie Adair, a longtime presence on the Nashville jazz scene. Listening to the opening track, a very hip reading of “As Long As I Live,” it is immediately apparent that this is a lady who knows how to sing. Having Adair and her compatriots, bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown, with occasional contributions from George Tidwell on trumpet and Denis Solee on tenor sax, as her musical foundation is a definite plus. Her song selection is terrific, offering a program replete with tunes mostly familiar, but not overdone, songs like “I’ll Close My Eyes,” “Oh! Look At Me Now,” “You Fascinate Me So,” “It Amazes Me” and “Will You Still Be Mine?” Most impressive is Ramey’s excellent feeling for lyric interpretation. This album should propel Ramey into the national spotlight, a place that she deserves to be. (www.monicaramey.com) 4/1/13”

Joe Lang, Jersey Jazz Society Magazine

"Let me say about Monica Ramey... I have watched and listened to this woman grow by leaps and bounds over the last 4 years. She is now the consummate professional... talented, creative, energetic & commited. Anyone fortunate enough to hear this lovingly crafted album, her first solo effort, is in for a treat. You will be, as I was, totally enamoured by her charms. It is a pleasure and an honor to be a part of it. Way to go, Monica!"”

— Denis Solee, Musician/Arranger/Educator

Monica Ramey and The Beegie Adair Trio. You’re probably aware of Adair from a host of previous albums. She’s a polite, John Bunch-Teddy Wilson-ish style pianist who most likely pleases both the lounge and jazz crowds. On this album, Adair and her trio, Roger Spencer, bass, and Chris Brown, drums, are joined by stylish singer Monica Ramey. Her not-so-common last name makes me wonder if there might be a connection to Gene Ramey, a bass player held in high esteem from another generation. In any case, she treats 14 evergreens with charm and respect. And I liked the fact that, along with the familiar material, there are few lesser known gems on the menu, tunes you don’t often hear that are simply too good to ever go away, including “I’ll Close My Eyes,” “You Fascinate Me So,” “It Amazes Me,” and “Why Did I Choose You.” Adair’s trio is augmented on several cuts by soloists George Tidwell on trumpet and flugelhorn and Denis Solee, saxophones and flute. With additional tunes like “Change Partners,” “Whisper Not,” “Oh, Look At Me Now” and “Will You Still Be Mine,” this is a dandy meeting featuring some classy contributors. 4/1/13”

— Portland Jazz Society News

Monica Ramey: And the Beegie Adair Trio (2012 [2013], Adair Music Group): Standards singer, second album, rolls out 14 songs, 72 minutes, backed by Adair's piano trio plus horn spots for George Tidwell (trumpet, flugelhorn) and Dennis Soles (saxes, flute). As is often the case, this rises or slips on the songs -- "I Thought About You" caught my ear, then the pairing of "Witchcraft" and "This Could Be the Start of Something Big" -- she frames them nicely, can turn on the gusto or sass or take a delicate ballad. The band does the job, which is all it really takes. B+(***) 4/1/13”

Tom Hull

Speaking of songbook standards, singer Monica Ramey has a neat one out: Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio(Adair Music). Ramey has her work cut out for her, since Adair is one of the finest and most tasteful accompanists on the scene today. And a well-kept secret. Both artists tug at your ear. Fortunately for Ramey, Adair knows how to frame and support without stepping on toes. And Ramey never succumbs to mawkish cliches—she's always all in but never over-doing what's been done. There are peppy and penetrating renditions of Witchcraft, This Could Be the Start of Something Big and Will You Still Be Mine. Ramey is grace all the way. But this one is worth grabbing just for Adair's piano—a favorite of Marian McPartland. Quite the chord-voicing minx. 3/4/13”

Marc Myers, JazzWax

Monica Ramey - And The Beegie Adair Trio 4/4 O's Notes: The Beegie Adair Trio is a staple in the Nashville jazz scene. Vocalist Monica Ramey has enjoyed hearing them on many occasions and joined them to sing a few tunes as well. The trio, Adair (p), Roger Spencer (b) and Chris Brown (d) swings with ease accented by Monica's delicate melodies. She takes the microphone and the spotlight for this release singing traditional classics that resonate with even the most discerning listener. 3/4/13”

D. Oscar Groomes.

"I wasn't familiar with Monica Ramey but she put a hurting on the standards that she and Beegie Adair decided to record. "Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio" is something special. This lady knows how to draw a listener in and keep him/her right where she wants them. This is a serious winner. Hats off to Monica Ramey and especially Beegie Adair for seeing the gift in this wonderful vocalist.” 2/25/13”

— Harvest Williams, Jazz Programmer

MUSICAL NOTES Rating: Best Some fantastic jazz tunes can be enjoyed when listening to the new Album by Monica Ramey And The Beegie Adair Trio. Their self-titled collective (in retail February 26th) is a wonderful salute to jazz standards featuring a few selections out of The Great American Songbook. Although both Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio (Beegie Adair, Roger Spence, Chris Brown) have numerous collections under their belt, this is their debut assemblage from the Adair Music Group. The results are an outstanding collaboration between vocalist and musicians yielding a flawless recording. Monica Ramey And The Beegie Adair Trio’s latest is unique. As Ramey states, “The album is special because I learned these songs listening to the trio, live,over the years at their weekly Nashville gig. They are extremely accessible and easy to love. I adore the trio’s signature interpretation of a few standards, as well as many tunes that are more obscure to even the truest of jazz fans. So, it’s a pleasure to be able to share them with everyone and with such incomparable company.” The set opens on a swinging note. “As Long As I Live” presents Ramey’s sophisticated vocals with Adair enchantingly tickling the ivories. It is just an all-around fun track. The playful tone of “Witchcraft” is perfect for dancing. Ramey and the Trio take us on a marvelous journey with “I Thought About You.” It encompasses excellent arrangement with heartfelt vocals. “Fly Away” is a Beegie Adair original. He co-wrote this beautiful tune with Lori Mechem. “Why Did I Choose You”, “Change Partners”, “You Fascinate Me So” and “Will You Still Be Mine” are just a few of the priceless gems included. The partnership between Ramey and Adair Trio offers an extraordinary, special treat for followers of both. It is a collectible that leaves fans wanting more. Monica Ramey began performing at the ripe age of three in her small Indiana town. Since, she has performed with numerous greats while traveling extensively throughout the United States. She is also a supporter of the Man and Woman of the Year for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. 2/7/13”

Ester Callens, Birmingham Times

ADAIR MUSIC GROUP MONICA RAMEY & the Beegie Adair Trio: "Anthony Wilson says this thrush can warble and Adair went so far as to start a record label to release her, so I'm tempted not to even listen to it and just tell you it's a winner. Not sporting? Oh, alright, I'll be back in an hour. Tick tick tick tick. Back again. I win. How does so much cool, mainstream jazz come out of Nashville? Pairing an mainstream jazz trio that's proud of being mainstream and a vocalist who knows how to deliver in service to the song yields a classic feeling jazz vocal record with no dust on it. Exactly what you'd go to a piano bar to hear instead of dried cheese they usually serve, this is jazz to hang out with. Abashedly accessible from all the participants, this is a great gateway drug for potential jazzbos too intimidated by the jazz police and unable to know which Coltrane and Miles to jump in with. Well done throughout.” 1/26/13”

Midwest Record

Combine the musical chemistry of one of the world’s most successful jazz trios with singer Monica Ramey’s elegantly lush, lyrical interpretations and you have the enchanting musical conversation Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio. Produced by Beegie Adair and Roger Spencer, the album also features jazz masters George Tidwell and Denis Solee on several tracks. The result is a collection of some of jazz’s most venerated songs, as well as the introduction of an original tune co-written by Adair and pianist Lori Mechem. “The album is special because I learned these songs listening to the trio, live, over the years.” says Ramey. “I adore the trio’s signature interpretations of standards, as well as many tunes that are more obscure to even the truest jazz fan. It’s a pleasure to share them with the audience and to be in such incomparable company. 1/14/13”

Nashville Arts Magazine

A Giant Steps Christmas: Monica Ramey and Beegie Adair, the Scissormen and Michael Chabon's latest Cool Yule by RON WYNN Some of us do our Christmas shopping weeks, even months, in advance. But there's always a good chunk of the populace that waits until the absolute last minute before embarking on a frantic search for something a friend might enjoy. In that spirit, here are a few items that would be ideal if you're out and about over the weekend and have someone in mind whose musical interests range outside the conventional pop/rock sphere. Item #1 - Local jazz delight Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio(Adair Music) Understatement and subtlety are dying arts in contemporary musical circles, but they are a big part of what makes Monica Ramey such a great jazz vocalist. She can be dramatic and flamboyant when the situation demands, but she's far more a song stylist and exquisite storyteller than someone dependent on bombast and production. The same is true for the Beegie Adair Trio, with bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown ideal collaborators for pianist Adair's alternately elegant and intense phrases, solos and accompaniment. All these players have great technique, but their disciplined interpretations never lack joy or passion. Special guests trumpet and flugelhorn ace George Tidwell and stellar saxophonist/flutist Denis Solee prove equally capable contributors to this tremendous session. Another plus is the disc's blend of vintage and contemporary tunes. One moment Ramey's doing a selection from the Great American Songbook, the next a composition from the duo of Adair and Nashville Jazz Workshop co-founder and pianist Lori Mechem ("Fly Away") or a number penned by legendary critic Leonard Feather and esteemed saxophonist/composer Benny Golson ("Whisper Not"). The set has been expertly engineered and mastered, with co-producers Spencer and Adair giving listeners a broad and varied portrait of Ramey's sound over 14 selections and 72 minutes. While nothing tops hearing a singer and band in live performance, the Monica Ramey And The Beegie Adair Trio CD is certainly the next best way to enjoy these wonderful musicians. 12/27/12”

Ron Wynn, Nashville Scene

Terrific year for jazz and blues in 2012 All That Jazz … and Blues These are our choices for the Top 10 events, institutions and personalities for the year in jazz and blues circles. We make no claim to these being the only important things that occurred, but it's a start: 1. The Schmerhorn Symphony Center's jazz/world music series The Schmerhorn remains a prime destination for topflight jazz and world music events. Any year that includes stops by Branford Marsalis, McCoy Tyner, Diana Krall, Gilberto Gil and the Spanish Harlem Orchestra (among others) is a great one. Plus, the dancers at the Latin music concerts brought so much vitality into the building they loosened up the old guard among the audience. 2. WFSK-FM's 24/7 presence for jazz on the broadcast airwaves The gutting of WMOT-FM's weekday programming and demise of Vandy's wonderful WRVU-FM left a huge hole in radio options for jazz fans. WFSK, Fisk University's stalwart station, fills this gap with programming for devotees of both contemporary (smooth jazz) and classic (Jazz From Lincoln Center and Rahsaan Barber's new Generations in Jazz) fare. They present a nice mix of international/worldbeat shows, an array of talk programs from a black community perspective and outstanding specialty presentations covering other neglected areas like funk, dance and blues. 3. Marion James' 30th Anniversary Musicians Reunion benefit What began as a spontaneous, one-time party to help some struggling musicians has evolved into an annual event that attracted more bands and attention this year than ever before. Besides having known or worked with nearly every major R&B, soul and blues musician who's passed this way since the '60s, Marion James constantly seeks to help aging and forgotten performers get the necessary medical care to make it through their final years with dignity. 4. Local labels issue top recordings Premier saxophonist and bandleader Rahsaan Barber launched his label Music City Jazz, issuing recordings by his Everyday Magic band and outstanding pianist/composer/arranger Bruce Dudley. Jeff Coffin landed on the cover of Downbeat behind a fantastic release featuring his Mu'Tet, and Victor Wooten issued a pair of fine full-lengths on his own label, Vix Records. In addition, Franklin-based Naxos distributed important releases from foreign and domestic artists and companies. 5. Monica Ramey/Beegie Adair return to Birdland Being asked to appear once at Birdland — one of New York and the nation's prime jazz spots — is an honor. Getting a second shot, as was the case with vocalist Monica Ramey and pianist Beegie Adair, is even more impressive. The duo's newest recorded collaboration is out shortly, as Adair's releases — which feature her distinctive interpretations of standards — continue to win critical praise, with airtime on such syndicated shows as Jazz After Hours. 6. The Jazz Session comes to town Jason Crane's popular The Jazz Session podcast made its first Nashville visit this year. Crane's activities included a poetry reading at the Jazz Workshop, appearances on local radio stations and extensive one-on-one interviews with such area performers as Evan Cobb and Jeff Coffin. All his Nashville interviews are available online at thejazzsession.com. 7. The Nashville Jazz Workshop's numerous activities No local or regional entity combines music activism and education like the Nashville Jazz Workshop, led by the tireless husband-wife duo of bassist Roger Spencer and pianist Lori Mechem. Their menu includes classes, concerts (Snap on 2 & 4, contemporary jazz performers, etc.), radio broadcasts (Live From the Workshop) and tie-in performances and discussions with The Frist Center and Parnassus Books. 8. Nashville Jazz Orchestra live The Nashville Jazz Orchestra offers listeners the opportunity to hear a great swing unit that isn't a ghost band. Under the leadership of Jim Williamson — also an excellent trumpet and flugelhorn player — the NJO presents entertaining and diversified theme concerts, showing there's still plenty of life in the big band idiom. 9. The Belcourt brings Shirley Clarke's films to town The late Shirley Clarke's edgy, unusual films weren't commercial smashes, but they were vital portraits. The Belcourt brought two of them to Nashville for short runs: Ornette: Made in Americaspotlighted one of jazz's last innovators, while The Connection stripped away any pretense regarding drug addiction. 10. Top biographers visit Music City R.J. Smith's The One: The Life and Music of James Brown and Ben Sandmel's Ernie K-Doe: The R&B Emperor of New Orleans were stunning volumes devoted to R&B greats. Smith and Sandmel enlightened Music City audiences during appearances at Parnassus. 12/6/12”

Ron Wynn, Nashville Scene

"You did an outstanding job at your CD Release party introducing your new CD! The music you sang, with all of those wonderful musicians, was as good as it gets. Personally, I thought you demonstrated a "stage presence" that quite frankly, impressed me. Your voice and your delivery of each song was very professional and you appeared in complete control and confident. Great job! The Nashville Jazz Workshop has another success."”

— Gary W., Fan

January 23, 2008 Jazz singer studies for better improv (Photo Caption) Monica Ramey, a student at the Nashville Jazz Workshop, said the curriculum there has helped her grow as a jazz vocalist. By day, she runs the Man and Woman of the Year campaign for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. (ANGELA PATTERSON / THE TENNESSEAN) Monica Ramey learns to refine performances at Nashville Jazz Workshop By ANGELA PATTERSON Staff Writer When you see Monica Ramey step onto the stage, you're not quite sure what to expect. But when the East Nashvillian opens her mouth, a smooth, velvety voice formed by years of study and countless performances comes tumbling out, putting her own fresh spin on jazz standards. And if you ask the small-town girl from Francesville, Ind., she'll tell you that her four years of study at the Nashville Jazz Workshop have helped her transform into a true jazz vocalist, arming her with both the theory and practical know-how she needs to be successful on stage. As she works on her first album this year, she hopes that it's not only a great album, but also the first of many more memorable musical experiences. Ramey picks up energy, stage presence One wouldn't necessarily think that a young girl from a town with 900 people would be listening to jazz. But thanks to her mother, who was a music teacher and musician, she'd been exposed to the genre from an early age. ""I grew up listening to a lot of singers who would sing Broadway tunes and standards," Ramey said. "I was always drawn to the clever and usually colorful lyrics more than anything. I didn't actually have much formal training in jazz until I started studying at the Nashville Jazz Workshop, which is where I've found my voice and direction, musically. "I did a lot of theatre as a child, so I understood the importance of the lyric. Performing in a musical and performing jazz are two totally different things, but it was still a natural transition for me." After performing all over Indiana, and becoming a standout singer in college, Ramey moved to Nashville in 2000. At first, she questioned if this was the place for her, but when she connected with the Nashville Jazz Workshop, she felt she'd found a home away from home in the Music City. "People study here for various reasons. It's a safe place to learn, whether I'm gaining knowledge or enhancing what I already know," she said. "The faculty here's seen it all. A lot of the time the curriculum at a college will teach theory, but it doesn't match what actually happens on a bandstand. That's what we learn here. You learn how to be a respected vocalist or musician." Ironically, Ramey is not a big fan of public speaking, but when she steps onstage to sing, she's completely at ease. "It's a rush to feed off of the energy of the musicians and the audience and when you're working with the right players — it's a workout," Ramey said. " You listen more intently and you're constantly exploring new ways to approach the tune. It makes a huge difference. "When everyone is bringing something to the performance, you are able to give so much more and that is so incredibly fulfilling to me." Classes help her, she helps workshop Ramey said the classes at the Jazz Workshop have helped her to enhance her stage performance. Recently, she took her most fulfilling, and challenging, series of classes, which were focused on vocal improvisation. "This was something new for me," Ramey said. "I was feeling good musically, and then I stepped into this and felt naked. It took a long time to adapt to this new atmosphere. I'm so proud that I was able to do it. For most vocalists, improvisation is not where you start. "Now I hear tones differently — I appreciate what the instrumentalists are doing so much more. It was really a chance to branch out, and apply it to what I already know." Feeling that the workshop has given her so much, she helps the organization prosper by writing grant requests and doing other development work. "Monica's been an excellent student and leader," said Nashville Jazz Workshop co-founder Lori Mechem. "She's been a role model for younger and less experienced students. She's gone through all the classes, and she's developed into a very good singer." Ramey's now ready to try another challenge: her first album. She said the album has a happier, more playful theme, thanks to the songs selected. "Roger Spencer, co-founder of NJW, once told me that albums are simply snapshots of where you are, musically, at that time in your life," Ramey said. "So, I hope that everyone can listen and appreciate where I am, musically, at this time and be excited for what will come in the future. "More than anything, though, I hope that people simply find joy in listening to the great music."

Ladies Day – Monica Ramey and The Beegie Adair Trio

© -Steven Cerra, copyright protected; all rights reserved.



IT'S ABOUT THE LITTLE THINGS. THE SUBTLE THINGS.

“It was a thought that repeated in my mind as I listened to this album. My ear would be captured by the very personal way Monica's voice caressed a long-known melody, or by an oblique turn of phrase or harmony chosen by her empathetic, almost telepathic, accompanist, Beegie Adair. A song, such as "Change Partners" or "Lullaby of the Leaves," might have at its foundation a rhythmic feeling that simply drew me in and wouldn't let go. Sometimes, a lyric that I hadn't been aware of, such as one in "Witchcraft," took me by pleasant surprise and deeper into the song. As I listened, I noticed that small, seemingly unimportant, variations in instrumentation (George Tidwell's harmon-muted trumpet; a duo between Monica and Roger Spencer's warm contrabass; a cheeky, Basie-like figure from the piano; a lyrical tenor solo by Denis Solee) gave energy and a sense of lift to this collection of wonderful songs.


Monica Ramey sings with grace and elegance. Sometimes her voice moves into a territory of supple huskiness that I associate with Ella Fitzgerald. Other times, it has an agility and precision reminiscent of Barbra Streisand, someone I know is one of Monica's hugest influences. Monica uses these abilities to deliver the world of the song first to your ears (sometimes it's like she's singing directly to you), then to a much deeper place where you can really feel it. And above everything it's the feeling that's palpable, all the way through to the closing strains of "Why Did I Choose You," the stunning duet between Monica and Beegie that closes the set.
As the music played, I remained pleasurably aware of the grain of emotion, heart, musical honesty and beauty woven throughout this album. And all along the way, the little, subtle things continued to accumulate, creating a harmonious, luminous whole.”-Anthony Wilson, Jazz guitarist


"Now that the trend of aging rockers cutting albums of show tunes and standards seems thankfully to have run its course, we're back to vocalists with a real feel for and understanding of the jazz tradition doing them justice.Nashville's Monica Ramey is a shining example. Her excellent release Make Someone Happy offers resourceful,soaring and engaging interpretations of material from The Great American Songbook."- Ron Wynn, Nashville Scene


I am terrible at this sort of thing, but the title of this piece is intended as a play-on-words involving Lester Young’s nickname for the legendary Jazz vocalist, Billie Holiday. Lester, himself an iconic tenor saxophonist, called Billie “Lady Day” and she called him “The President” which was later shortened to “Prez.”
His sound on tenor sax blended so well with Billie’s sultry voice that they became forever associated with one another in the minds of many Jazz fans. Given how well vocalist Monica Ramey works with pianist Beegie Adair, the allusion to Billie Holiday immediately came to mind and was reinforced by the fact that Monica and Beegie are both ladies. But enough about my poor attempts at word play, let’s turn our attention to Monica and Beegie. Like Prez and Lady Day, Monica and Beegie were made for each other.


Simple as that.


The interplay between Monica’s song stylings and Beegie’s piano accompaniment is beautiful to behold.
They fit together: nothing strained or exaggerated. The music just flows between them. And although they make it sound so effortless, what they do together and how well they do it is really rare and very special.



Ron Wynn, writing in the January 26, 2012 edition of The Nashville Scene describes it this way:
“According to Adair, Monica has a really good ear. “She can hear things in a song and do things vocally that give me a lot of freedom as an accompanist. There are so many singers who have pitch problems. She's also a really hard worker. She pays attention and always strives for the right sound. Of course, she's studied under Sandra (Dudley), so you know she's gotten really good instruction.’
‘Beegie is a vocalist's pianist,’ Ramey responds when asked what she likes about working with Adair. ‘She knows lyrics. She's thoughtful about musical conversations, and she creates so many avenues. If I just take the right approach, I know she'll provide me with what I need.’ ‘There are not many singers who can hear those harmonic opportunities if the pianist takes them,’ Adair says. ‘There are some singers I've played behind that never knew what to do if you tried to go in a different direction. Monica can make those moves. She really allows me to take a song in any direction.’”

In an ideal world, Monica and Beegie would be appearing together at a supper club near you every weekend. Of course, bassist Roger Spencer and drummer Chris Brown would have to be there, too; nothing like a bassist to frame the bottom of the chord and the swishing sound of brushes on a snare drum and riveted ride cymbal to add dimension to the music.
You’d take your best girl or guy [sounds better than “significant other”] for an early dinner and while relaxing over a nice bottle of wine, Monica and Beegie’s trio would play two, one hour sets at 8:30 and 10:30 PM filling your soul with the beauty of Jazz that is sung and played to perfection.


Have you ever noticed how approachable Jazz vocalists and musicians are?  Jazz is an intimate music and I love hearing it performed in an intimate setting. It’s great when you can reach out to one of the musicians and compliment them on their playing, or request a tune to be played during the next set or ask them to autograph their latest CD.


Perhaps Monica would have already sung some of your favorite tunes in the first set, songs like – As Long As I Live, I Thought About You [Johnny Mercer’s lyrics!], I’ll Close My Eyes, Witchcraft, This Could Be The Start Of Something Big, or Oh! Look at Me Now.
And maybe Monica would agree to close the second set with just she and Beegie at the piano poignantly performingWhy Did I Choose You? and sending everybody home holding hands and dreamy-eyed with the lovely lyrics and beautiful melody of this Michael Leonard and Herbert Martin tune still fresh in their minds.

The musicianship that Monica and Beegie display is so good and made for such a delightful evening for you and your guest that you drop by the bandstand on your way out to thank them for the treat and promise to return the following weekend.
And when you do, Monica and Beegie’s trio sing and play more of your favorite songs among them: Lullaby of the Leaves, Whisper Not and Will You Still Be Mine?

They also introduce you to some music that is new to you like You Fascinate Me So and It Amazes Me – both by Cy Coleman and Carolyn Leigh and Fly Away with words and music by Lori Meecham and Beegie Adair.
Unfortunately, this ideal world does not exist as many of us do not have a chance to drop by our local Jazz bistro and supper club and listen to Monica and Beegie on a regular basis [although if you are in the NYC area, they will be appearing at Birdland on May 2, 2013].
So what’s the next best thing? How about a CD of Monica, Beegie, Roger and Chris performing all of the tunes, one that you can listen to over and over again to your heart’s content? If this is the case, then your heart will be contented because such a CD is set to be released next month.

Chris DiGirolamo and his team at Two for The Show Media is handling the press and publicity for the forthcoming CD by Monica and Beegie Adair’s Trio which will be available for purchase on February 26, 2013.

Chris has this to say about Monica, Beegie and the recording in his media relations release:

© -Chris DiGirolamo/Two For The Show Media; used with permission, copyright protected; all rights reserved.
“Vocalist Monica Ramey and The Beegie Adair Trio release Self-titled debut from the Adair Music Group. February 26'", 2013

Vocalist Monica Ramey's much-anticipated new album, 'Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio' (Adair Music Group) is coming! Ramey's sophomore album accentuates the undeniable chemistry of one of the world's most successful jazz trios (Beegie Adair, piano; Roger Spencer, bass; Chris Brown, drums) with a vocalist (Ramey) who elegantly interweaves lush, lyrical sophistication to an already immaculate musical conversation. Produced by Adair and Spencer, the album also features on two of the trio and Ramey's most beloved musical mates, jazz masters George Tidwell and Denis Sole, on several tracks. The result is the introduction and re-introduction of some of jazz's much adored and forgotten songs and the introduction of an original tune, co-written by Adair.
"The album is special because I learned these songs listening to the trio, live, over the years at their weeklyNashville gig. They are all extremely accessible and easy to love." boasts Ramey "I adore the trio's signature interpretation of a few standards, as well as many tunes that are more obscure to even the truest of jazz fans. So, it's a pleasure to be able to share them with everyone and with such incomparable company."

"Producing this project with Roger was an absolute joy." Adair states. "I'm extremely proud of this album and believe the trio's fans will thoroughly enjoy it. Monica's growing fan base will surely adore it as well. There are really so many reasons to love this album, including the fact that it really swings!"


About Monica Ramey:
This kind of reaction is a reoccurring theme in the case of Midwest native Monica Ramey and artists like Donna McElroy, Jim Ferguson, Denis Solee, Jeff Steinberg, Lori Mechem, Roger Spencer, George Tidwell, Sandra Dudley and Beegie Adair are just a few who are singing her praise.
Monica is a native of Francesville, one of Indiana's smallest towns. The youngest of three children, her father is a retired farmer and her mother a retired music teacher. As a child, Monica would sing and dance on stage with her mother's high school show choir, and at the age of 3, she stood on the grand piano at the school's cabaret and performed Tomorrow from the musical, Annie. By the age of 11, she had become well known in Indiana after starring in several local and professional Broadway musical productions. As a teenager, she studied at the Los Angeles County High School of the Arts, and in 1995, Monica was selected to become a member of the GRAMMY National All American High School Jazz Band and Choir.
This break would become one of the most important opportunities in Monica's life. Being one of 12 selected nationally for the choir, Monica had little jazz experience, but while performing with some of the music industry's finest, she discovered the impact of jazz music in her own life and in our society. The responsibility all performers have to its preservation and authenticity left a profound and lasting impact on her.
Monica studied Music Performance at Indiana State University and was a member of the ISU Jazz Singers. She became a favorite singer among many faculty members and even the President of the university. This led to many performances at university functions and sporting events. She interned for the NARAS Foundation in Los Angeles, where the preservation of jazz music became a focal point of her responsibilities.
In 2000, she moved to Nashville to pursue her singing career, where she discovered the Nashville Jazz Workshop. NJW has given Monica the opportunity to study under some of Nashville finest musicians including Lori Mechem,Roger Spencer, Sandra Dudley, Beegie Adair, Jeff Steinberg, Rod McGaha, Jim Ferguson, Roy Agee, Annie Sellick as well as create a family away from home.
On her debut album, Make Someone Happy, Monica is joined by the Lori Mechem Trio and special guest, Beegie Adair. This special project hosts many standard tunes with horn arrangements by Denis Solee and two original tunes by Lori Mechem, Beegie Adair and Hal Stephens. Produced by Lori Mechem, Roger Spencer and Sandra Dudley, the album captures the finest example of Monica's musical capabilities at this point in her career. Make Someone Happy is receiving international airplay on jazz radio, Pandora, Music Choice and DMX to name a few.



Her much-anticipated second album, Monica Ramey and the Beegie Adair Trio, accentuates the undeniable chemistry of one of the world's most successful jazz trios (Beegie Adair, piano; Roger Spencer, bass; Chris Brown, drums) with a vocalist (Ramey) who elegantly interweaves lush, lyrical sophistication to an already immaculate musical conversation. Produced by Adair and Spencer, the album also features on two of the trio and Ramey's most endeared musical mates, jazz masters George Tidwell and Denis Sole, on several tracks. The result is the introduction and re-introduction of some of jazz's most beloved and forgotten songs and the introduction of an original tune, co-written by Adair.

Monica performs regularly in various venues, festivals and private events throughout the U.S. including the legendary Birdland, Nashville Jazz Workshop, F. Scott's and many others. When not studying or performing, Monica enjoys spending time with her friends, her family and volunteering for the Nashville Jazz Workshop. Monica also supports the Man & Woman of the Year campaign for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.”

Here are two links at which you can purchased the CD after its release date of 2/26/2013:
www.monicaramey.com www.beegieadair.com

This video montage is set to Monica’s duo with Beegie on Why Did I Choose You? The sheer beauty of this piece may tempt you to hold your breath for 4:54 minutes. Probably not a good idea.

http://jazzprofiles.blogspot.com/2013/01/ladies-day-monica-ramey-and-beegie.html
Steven Cerra
Jazz Profiles